Noteworthy Hong Kong neighborhood battles to save its past

Historic Hong Kong neighborhood fights to preserve its past

In a city that changes as quick as the climate, it might be not entirely obvious Hong Kong’s past.

Be that as it may on a slowing down in Wan Chai, one of the city’s most established neighborhoods, a house painted splendid blue emerges.

The “Blue House,” a Chinese dwelling building from the 1920s, is at the heart of a group of noteworthy structures that paint a picture of old Hong Kong.

Home to the Hong Kong House of Stories, a varied exhibition hall and group focus that offers voyages through notable locales in the zone, the building gives an essential flash into the area’s rich history.

A piece away, 50-story highrises weaving machine and preservationists stress over the effect of gentrification on the area’s character.

“We need nearby individuals to tell neighborhood stories,” says Maria Kwok, a volunteer visit guide who has existed in Wan Chai for very nearly three decades.

“In the event that you return in a couple of years, this area may have totally changed.”

The Blue House itself, which pressed working population families into small rooms after it was implicit the 1920s, is the first stop on the legacy visit.

Dwelling houses like these were once basic in the area and the city.

Presently, alongside two different dwellings adjacent, the Blue House is one of the few remaining.

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Sanctuaries, post work places, war

In the encompassing pieces, other old structures, in the same way as a modest 1847 sanctuary and a demure 1915 mail station, are slipped between loft towers.

Of note is Pak Tai Temple, a Taoist sanctuary implicit 1863 and a desert spring of incense-scented cool.

The House of Stories additionally offers an evening “frequented visit” that imparts “spooky stories” of the area’s most creepy locales.

The Japanese bombarding and occupation of Hong Kong amid World War II fuel stories of phantoms in Wan Chai.

Source: http://edition.cnn.com/2014/08/17/travel/historic-wan-chai/index.html?hpt=travel_hp_herobox

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